Sunday, August 15, 2010

Cross pollination 14 August

On Saturday 14 August I cross pollinated two of my Phalaenopsis hybrids, P. Golden Wonder with an anonymous large pink hybrid from Woolworths. I will systematically post the progress of the pods (if any) on a monthly basis. Here are the flowers. The pollen donor is P. Golden wonder.

P. Golden wonder
P. Large pink (Woolworths)

9 comments:

  1. Wow, Dave I really like the pink!

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  2. can you please tell me how u cross pollinated, where is the pollen, my Phalaenopsis flowers but can't see any pollen to pollinate. please explain how u get the pollen of donor P. Golden wonder.

    thx Dave this is good stuff, it sure interesting

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  3. Hi John

    Phalaenopsis pollination is thankfully quite simple compared to some smaller genera. If you look at the flower from the front, right in the middle is a part that projects towards you. This is where the pollinia can be found, behind a cap or cover. If you look carefully you will see a small sticky pad set a little back from the cap and under it. If you use a toothpick you can easily attach this pad to the end of the toothpick and bring it forward to release the pollinia. The cap will come off easily and is usually quite loose. The pollinia will present themselves as two round yellow masses of equal size set next to each other and attached to it will be a short transparent stalk with the sticky pad.

    I hope this helps. Let me know if you are successful

    Regards

    David

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  4. :D thx you David wow this is great yes i have removed cap and as you said the pollen is presented, and one more thing how do i know my phalaenopsis is a female or a male most plant they are hermaphrodite but not sure these orchids are. Now that i have the pollen where do i put it to fertilize.
    thank you David this would help me try to make my plant to produce one or two pods

    regards

    John

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  5. Hi John

    Orchid flowers have both male and female parts. In Phalaenopsis the female part sits behind and more in-set to where you collected the pollinia. If you turn the flower upside down you will see the receptive area where to put the pollinia. If the flower accepts the pollinia it wil wilt and the ovary section will begin to swell until ripe. This time varies from plant to plant and from greenhouse to greenhouse but I often leave my pods to ripen for up to six months or longer before harvesting for embryo culture.

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  6. thank Dave this is great on what u do here, i'm sure will come back here to catchup on your update. this is by far fully detail on then any other site i come across

    thank you for the advice.

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  7. You are most welcome John. Keep us posted on your progress.

    Regards

    David

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    Replies
    1. Hi David,

      It’s about 4 months now just to update you of my experiment about the fertilization, never thought that I would successfully get me plant to produce some pods, but it has produce 4 pods. Yeah finding it’s interesting and will keep you updated of the outcome. I hope that the pods will continue to mature before the parent plant die.

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  8. Hi John

    Great! Keep an eye on the pods. They usually take 4-7 months to mature. The parent plant shouldn't die with the production of pods.

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